Category: Bitless Bridles

LG Bridle

A European design, known as a “Gluecksrad” or “LG bridle,” uses a six-spoked metal wheel that connects headstall, noseband and chinstrap to add some leverage. There are different ways to connect the reins for various levels of leverage or no more »

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Dr. Cook Bitless Bridle

Jowl Straps are crossed underneath the horse’s head and after passing through a ring are connected to the reins. Brief pressure on one rein pushes on the opposite side of the head, which makes the horse turn his head. Tugging more »

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Dual-Halter by Peter Graßl

Similar to the Dr. Cook Bitless Bridle, the Dual Halter uses cords that cross under and put pressure on poll and nose of the horse. http://www.swingtree.de/index.php?mp=400&aktion=zaeumung&lk=en

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Nurtural Bitless Bridle

http://www.nurturalhorse.com/ Similar design to the Dr. Cook Bitless Bridle. Straps are joined with a leather piece under the head.

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Sidepull

A side pull is a simple bitless bridle. Reins are attached to rings on either side of the horse’s muzzle. When both reins are pulled, pressure is placed on the horse’s nose, asking for a halt. Pulling on one rein more »

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Bitless Indian Bridle, Indian Bosal, Indian Hackamore

It is a simple design, consisting only of yacht rope just like the rope halters. The ropes criss-cross beneath the horses jaw and are guided through rings, and your direct rein tells the horse in which direction to go. The more »

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Hackamore with Bosal

Bosals and Hackamores were originally used to start colts in training. A hackamore does not injure sensitive tissue in the colt’s mouth and provides firm and safe control. The term Hackamore and Bosal are used interchangeable, but technically the Bosal more »

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